Group Photo from June 26, 2020 Group photo from June 26, 2020. From left to right, top to bottom: Julie Kline, Priyanka Raina, Kartik Prabhu, Kathleen Feng, Kalhan Koul, Michael Oduoza, Haitong Li, Hongjie Wang, Isabela David Rodrigues, Charles Tsao, Denisse Ventura, Jackson Melchert, Akash Levy and Weier Wan.

Research Summary

Stanford accelerate group works on creating high performance and energy-efficient architectures and design methodology for domain-specific hardware accelerators in existing and emerging technologies.

People

Faculty

Priyanka Raina

image-left Email: praina AT stanford DOT edu
Contact: Allen Building - Room 114, (857) 209-8205
About: Priyanka Raina is an Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Previously, she was a Visiting Research Scientist in the Architecture Research Group at NVIDIA Corporation. She received her Ph.D. degree in 2018 and S.M. degree in 2013 in EECS from MIT and her B.Tech. degree in EE from IIT Delhi in 2011.
Teaching: Priyanka teaches EE271: Introduction to VLSI Systems in the Fall and EE272: Design Projects in VLSI Systems in the Winter.

 

Administrator

Julie Kline

image-left Email: klinej AT stanford DOT edu
Contact: Packard Building - Room 359, (650) 723-4539
About: Julie Kline is a Faculty Administrator at Stanford, and she supports several Electrical Engineering professors and their research teams. She holds a master’s degree in English from San Jose State University, and prior to her work at Stanford, she spent several years teaching academic writing and rhetoric at De Anza College in Cupertino. Julie is an active member at Coastal Repertory Theatre in Half Moon Bay, where in addition to acting, directing, and producing, she serves on several committees and the Board of Directors.

PhD Students

Haitong Li

image-left Email: haitongl AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://web.stanford.edu/~haitongl
About: Haitong Li is an EE Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University, supervised by Prof. H.-S. Philip Wong and co-advised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. Previously, he was a Research Intern in the Device, Circuit and System (DCS) Group at Arm. He received M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2017, and B.S. in Microelectronics from Peking University, China, in 2015. He is a recipient of 2016 IEEE EDS Masters Student Fellowship.
Research: My research is focused on in-memory computing enabled by emerging non-volatile memory technologies. The application space ranges from deep learning inference (DAC’19) to hyper-dimensional computing (IEDM’16, ISSCC’18) for cognitive applications, while leveraging the unique physical characteristics of emerging devices (e.g., stochasticity, 3D vertical connectivity). I also collaborate closely with Prof. Subhasish Mitra (Stanford) and Prof. Jan Rabaey (UC Berkeley). For more details, please refer to my Google Scholar profile.

Weier Wan

image-left Email: weierwan AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/weier-wan/
About: Weier Wan is an EE Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University, supervised by Prof. H.-S. Philip Wong and co-advised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. Previously, he was a Research Intern at Google X. He received M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2017, and B.S. in Electrical Enginnering and Computer Science and B.A. in Physics from UC Berkeley, in 2015.
Research: My research focuses on using resistive memory (RRAM) based analog in-memory computing to enable energy and area-efficient machine learning. Recently I designed and taped-out (and currently testing) a fully-integrated mixed-signal chip with RRAM synapses monolithically integrated with CMOS neurons. The chip implements inference and training for Restricted Boltzmann Machine, a type of probablistic graphical model, as well as inference for MLPs and RNNs. The project is a collaborative effort with Prof. Gert Cauwenberghs (UCSD) and Prof. Huaqiang Wu (Tsinghua University). I also studied novel techniques for quantizing deep neural networks (https://github.com/google-research/google-research/tree/master/cnn_quantization).

Akash Levy

image-left Email: akashl AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/akashlevy/
About: Akash Levy is an EE Ph.D. student at Stanford University, supervised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. Previously, he was a Research Intern at Amazon Lab126 and Amazon Web Services. He received a B.S.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2018, with certificates in Applications of Computing and Engineering Physics. He is a recipient of the 2018 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.
Research: My current research is focused on improving the efficiency of reconfigurable logic devices (such as FPGAs and CGRAs) through the use of 3D integration with emerging nanotechnologies. In particular, I am developing a hybrid design that makes use of both resistive random access memory (RRAM) and nanoelectromechanical (NEM) relays to implement reconfigurable switching in the back-end-of-line for reduced reconfigurability overhead. My ultimate goal is to enable reconfigurable logic devices to become more competitive with ASICs in terms of power, area, and performance. My pre-PhD research involved a broad range of subjects, ranging from physics to computer security. For more details, please refer to my Academia.edu portfolio and my Google Scholar profile.

Kathleen Feng

image-left Email: kzf AT stanford DOT edu
About: Kathleen Feng is an EE Ph.D. student at Stanford University, supervised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. She received a B.S.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2018, with certificates in Applications of Computing and Robotics and Intelligent Systems. She is a recipient of the NDSEG Fellowship.
Research: My current research focuses on accelerating deep image processing pipelines (ISPs) on reconfigurable hardware. Deep ISPs combine low-level image processing techniques with high-level image classification, allowing for a more robust process. More generally, I am interested in designing and developing new computer architectures for computer graphics, vision, and related applications.

Jackson Melchert

image-left Email: melchert AT stanford DOT edu
About: Jackson Melchert is an EE Ph.D. student at Stanford University, supervised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. He received a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 2019.
Research: My research is currently focused on how to generate an optimal coarse-grained reconfigurable array processing element architecture for a given application domain. I am developing tools to analyze the applications that are going to be run on the CGRA to identify interesting PE architectures to be evaluated. I am also developing a PE generator that takes a high level specification of a PE from the application analysis and produces the hardware description of the PE, along with functional and formal models used in the application mapping process. I am broadly interested in optimizing configurable hardware to approach the performance and efficiency of application specific accelerators.

Kalhan Koul

image-left Email: kkoul AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kalhan-koul-290b2487
About: Kalhan Koul is an EE Ph.D. student at Stanford University supervised by Prof. Priyanka Raina. Previously, he was a Digital Design Intern at Micron and Silicon Labs. He received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering Honors and a B.A. in Plan II Honors (Liberal Arts) from The University of Texas in 2018.
Research: My current research focuses on automatically mapping applications, ranging from machine learning to image processing, onto reconfigurable logic devices (CGRAs). Previously, I helped design and tape-out a DNN accelerator utilizing resistive memory (RRAM) for low-energy inference and training. This chip exploited the low read cost and non-volatility of RRAM to store the weights of a DNN model, providing a low energy solution for edge and IoT devices. Broadly speaking, I am interested in improving the hardware design flow and developing highly performant and flexible hardware.

Masters Students

Kartik Prabhu

image-left Email: kprabhu7 AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://linkedin.com/in/kprabhu7/
About: Kartik Prabhu is an EE M.S. student at Stanford University. Previously, he was a software engineering intern at Cisco. He received a B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2018.
Research: My current research involves creating generators for DNN accelerators. The generator is written using high-level synthesis (HLS) to enable for the creation of a DNN accelerator given a set of parameters, and can generate many of the architectures that have been proposed.

Undergraduate Students

Michael Oduoza

image-left Email: mcoduoza AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://linkedin.com/in/michael-oduoza/
About: I am an EE co-term student at Stanford University.
Research: My current research is in the 3D integration of resistive random access memory (RRAM) and nanoelectromechanical (NEM) relays to create a hybrid CGRA design. This hybrid design has promise for reducing the reconfigurability overhead in programmable logic devices.

 

Charles Tsao

image-left Email: chtsao AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chtsao/
About: I am an EE co-term student at Stanford University.
Research: My current research focuses on the SoC side of the AHA Project. I’m currently focused on building architecture and software API to support end-to-end hardware reconfiguration and execution on various hardware targets at the press of a button. This software API, called the Reconfigurable Device Access Interface (RDAI) API, layers over hardware accelerator API to allow a Halide application to run end-to-end on a custom hardware accelerator (e.g. FPGA, CGRA).

 

Denisse Ventura

image-left Email: denissev AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deventura/
About: I am a CS + Math undergraduate student from the University of Florida. I am participating in the Stanford Engineering SURF 2020 Program.
Research: My current research focuses on one-shot learning and memory-augmented neural networks (MANNs). More specifically, I am investigating how to effectively map feature vectors of the neural networks onto RRAM-based associative memory.

 

Hongjie Wang

image-left Email: hongjiew AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hongjie-wang-3b17a1182/
About: I am a Physics undergraduate student from Peking University. I am participating in the Stanford Engineering UGVR 2020 Program.
Research: My current research focuses on the non-volatile memory (NVM) based neural network accelerator design, including the ReRAM-based in-memory computing architecture for one-shot learning applications and the MRAM-based neural network training acceleration with floating-point precision.

 

Isabela David Rodrigues

image-left
Email: isabdr AT stanford DOT edu
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/isabdr/
About: I am an international student from Brazil pursuing my B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering at Stanford University.
Research: FPGAs and CGRAs have fixed computation and memory resources, so large applications may not fit on them entirely. Moreover, compilation time also grows with the size of the application. My research focuses on creating a cost estimate function for application codes. With the cost estimate, we can optimally partition large applications on FPGAs and CGRAs to maximize their performance and reduce compilation time.

High-School Students

Akhilesh Balasingam

image-left
About: I am a high school senior, gaining experience doing university-level research under the mentorship of Akash Levy. I am working on RRAM modeling, neuromorphic architectures, and nanoelectromechanical (NEM) relays. My hobbies include hiking, squash, and playing the mridangam.